Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arl.liuc.it/dspace/handle/2468/5864
Title: The Great Depression and the Great Recession: a comparative analysis of their analogies
Authors: Peicuti, Cristina
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: European Association for Comparative Economic Studies (EACES)
Università Carlo Cattaneo - LIUC
Bibliographic citation: Peicuti Cristina (2014), The Great Depression and the Great Recession: a comparative analysis of their analogies. In: The European Journal of Comparative Economics, vol. 11, n. 1, 2014, p. 55-78. E-ISSN 1824-2979.
Abstract: The decades preceding the Great Depression and the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis have close similarities. Both decades were characterized by rapid growth without major contractions, by an increase in liquidity, a lack of inflation, and a generalized decrease in risk premiums. Additional similarities included significant changes in the financing of real estate by commercial banks along with a consolidation of the banking sector and high hopes that the efficiency of monetary policy would prevent financial crises. These decades were also characterized by the consolidation of the powers of young central banks (the Federal Reserve System in the 1920s and the European Central Bank in the 2000s), by unsuccessful attempts to control market speculation, by their international dimensions, and by the eruption of crises after the failure of a major American financial institution that could have been avoided. Understanding these analogies help us better identify the causes of the subprime mortgage crisis and prevent history from repeating itself to the extentof such large-scale devastating consequences.
URI: http://arl.liuc.it/dspace/handle/2468/5864
Journal/Book: The European journal of comparative economics
Appears in Collections:EJCE

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